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Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)
, the mississippi river, the straits of florida you look at the diversity in the gulf of mexico. then look at the challenges between, what i call the interaction between the man-made world and the natural world. this is a very important part of the world but also a very complex part of the world. what you get as we have an increasing population and expension of the infrastructure you have increasing interaction with the natural environment, greater degrees of complexity. when you introduce challenges like climate change and uncertainty, the level of the types of events that can occur there in terms of the magnitude and consequences grows. we know the frequency is increasing. we're going to talk about this unique area of the world from a couple of different perspectives. i would like you to think about a couple of things as we do this. this concept of restill yantcy. -- resiliantcy. having done many, many months in the gulf of several different disasters and crisis that were down there i came to think of resiliantcy similar to the human immune system. the pre-existing conditions are not cr
. the beneficiaries that are targeted underserved communities in louisiana, mississippi, alabama, and the florida panhandle. there are four components to this. the first is a program serving the developing improved community health programs. it is run by louisiana public health institute joined with the alliance institute which is a community-based organization. there is a mental and behavioral health program which has louisiana state university, southern mississippi university, the university of south alabama and the university of west florida. there is a literacy program which includes a washington- based group. that's got the literacy aimed at the literacy of the community and the community workers and those involved in with community activism and community projects. finally, there is a community health worker training program that is based at the university of south alabama. the overall goal here is one where resilience comes up in the language all the time but the resilience is very much in keeping with what we would do in public health. yesterday there was a meeting held at e.p.a. by the e.
every time to louisiana, alabama, florida, mississippi, missouri, alabama have needed aid for disasters. new jersey and new york's representatives regardless of party have stood up for them. it's now time for them to stand up for this region of the country as well. this should not be subject to politics. this is a basic function of government. and yeah i'm concerned about it, because every day it doesn't happen is a day it doesn't happen. i can't take anybody's assurances anymore. \[inaudible question] >> my understanding is that the flood insurance program will run out of money next week if not refinanced by congress. and so the speaker's irresponsible action in not moving on anything at least appears from the information i have been given will leave the flood insurance program broke by the end of next week. \[inaudible question] >> i'm not concerned about that, but more the indecision that's the problem. we found in nondisaster-related times, the fact is they couldn't make a decision. so businesses sat for months and months and months waiting to be made. sitting on the governor's desk
the tradition of providing relief. we have stood with the citizens of florida, alabama, mississippi, louisiana, iowa, vermont, california and missouri in their times of need. with us. [applause] [applause] so make no mistake. new jersey's spirit has never been stronger. our resolve never more firm. our unity never more obvious. let there also be no mistake -- much work still lies ahead. damage that comes only once in a century will take in some cases years to repair. here is some of what we have done already -- we have created a cabinet-level position to coordinate the state's efforts across every agency, and marc ferzan is here today, ready to work with you on this restoration effort. we've requested the federal government to pay 100% of the costs of the significant debris removal that we require -- and have already received $18 million for that task. we have secured $20 million from the federal highway administration for emergency repair of our roads, bridges and tunnels -- a down payment on a major infrastructure task ahead. we have directed our department of environmental protection to str
: mr. whitehouse of rhode island. mr. wicker of mississippi. the vice president: please raise your right hand. the vice president: please raise your right hand. do you solemnly swear that you will support and dend the constitution of the united states against all enees, foreign and domestic; that you bear true faith and allegiance to the same; that you take this obligion freely, without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion; and that you will well and faithfully discharge the duties of the office on which you are about to enter, so help you god? the group: io. the vice president: congratulations, senators. [applause] >> senators will carry out constitutional duties on friday when they walk over for a joint session of congress. they will count the local college votes. live cove on c-span 1:00 p.m. eastern. more with vice president biden who met with new and re-elected senators in the old senate chamber. the vice president does this at the start of each congress so the senators can have their photos of their swearing in with their families. >> congratulations, senator. >> than
offer those statistics earlier tonight about what is happening, poverty, in the state of mississippi. this is what we are talking about. this young woman is organizing a people and getting women together again to fight back and let their leaders here about the conditions that young people in poverty today are having to endure. tell me a bit about your work in mississippi. >> thank you for this opportunity. before i start to talk about my work, i would just like to say, bring a prison like my grandmother to the table, who was working at the hotel for 335 b 3:35 in the morning and at night time for the car factory on an acre and a half of land and a three-bedroom house, one bath and, and 20 of us in it. there is the true face of poverty. bring an expert like her to the table. her thing was to make sure we get educated. even as a young child, my escape from poverty was to get a good education. i knew once i got a good education, or at least tried to get a quality education, that would be my way out of poverty. that is what i continue to fight for. to build young people like me to lift o
in the city of chicago. almost one out of 10 guns in chicago came to the city from mississippi. mississippi. why? the background checks there, the gun dealers there, or a lot easier than in other places. they ended up selling these guns and corrupting interstate fields on the way. here's the basics. i think we all agree and i hope we all agree that the supreme court decision said that we can have reasonable limitation on the second amendment right and terms of the type of weapon and the people who own them and the background checks on those people. it is something that we desperately need to do. we know that 40% of the sales are not going through the background checks. that is a huge problem. it has created an abundance of weapons that are available. in the straw purchases, i salute the chairman for addressing this issue. it is one of the worst situations in our estate and in the city of chicago. i can point to one gun store in illinois that accounts for more than 20% of the crime guns in chicago. straw purchasers buy the gun there and they end up in the hands of criminals in the city of ch
stood with the citizens of florida and alabama, mississippi and louisiana, iowa and vermont, california and missouri in their times of need. now i trust they will stand with us. president >> obama on sunday signed a $9 billion aid bill for hurricane sandy flood relief programs. next tuesday the house is expected to vote on another bill with an additional $17 billion of aid and an amendment offering another $33.7 billion that would fund longer-term projects. you can see the speech at c- span.org and, as always, the house is live on c-span. >> tomorrow, the national governors' association will deliver the state of the state address. it will hear from the chair, the governor jack markell of delaware, and the vice chair. live coverage at 10:00 a.m. eastern. on c-span 2, a conversation on the future of afghanistan. that begins live at 10:00 eastern from the atlantic council. now, a hearing of nasa's mission looking at their strategic plans, robotic space flights, and private-public partnership. this house science and technology committee hearing is to end a half hours. -- two and a half hour
little- known fact is that he was a cheerleader at the university of mississippi. i am pleased to turn the floor over to mark shields. mark, please take it away. >> things for that great commentary on each of our distinguished panelists. as king henry viii said to each of his six wives, i will not keep you long. my job is to cull the wisdom on this stage tonight. i will just make two quick comments about the campaign that was finished, and it was a long campaign, and essentially humorless campaign. neither mr. romney nor mr. obama is a man given to self- deprecating lines, and perhaps the funniest guy turned out to be rick perry of taxes, who was there briefly, but rick perry stood up one night and told a group of us it was a strange feeling to stand next to mitt romney in each of those debates. he kept expecting mitt romney to lean over him and say, and you have any gray poupon. i like mitt romney as much as one good-looking guy can like another good looking guy and not be in violation of a texas state law. it was a marathon, and like most states marathons, the guy from kenya won. we
, the unemployment rate was 7.3%. today, it is 5.6%. the second lowest east of the mississippi and the lowest in the southeast. during that time, virginia has created 160,000 jobs, mostly in the private sector. in 2011, we hit our all-time high record for agricultural exports, at $2.35 billion, bolstering virginia's largest industry. together we put in place a stronger environment in which the private sector can create good paying jobs, and virginia is now outperforming its neighboring states. we have also worked hard together to get our fiscal house in order. three years ago, together we closed a budget shortfall of $6 billion without raising taxes. the results were good. we have had three consecutive budget surpluses totaling $1.40 billion. we more than doubled the rainy day fund. we gave two 3% performance bonuses to our great state employees. we have maintained virginia aaa bond rating while the federal government was losing theirs. we bolstered agency efficiency. we eliminated and consolidated dozens of boards and commissions and agencies and programs to save money. we set priorities and
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)